Beatrice

The BRAIN Initiative

Beatrice
The BRAIN Initiative

By gaining deeper insight to our cerebral functions may also enable us to fully understand how creativity works.

How creativity works in the brain, to some extent, is still misunderstood. Graham Wallace, a social psychologist and co-founder of the London School of Economics, proposed that the creative process is made up of four stages.

The first stage is Preparation, investigating the problem at hand using research, planning and getting in the right frame of mind to focus one’s attention. The second stage is Incubation, the unconscious process of no direct effort to address the problem. This is through abstention, doing other activities or by taking a break from all work. The third stage is Illumination, a flash of insight where your ideas align after allowing your mind to wander during incubation. Finally, there is verification, the deliberate effort to reduce the idea to an exact form. These four stages wouldn’t exist in isolation and involves all parts of the brain dynamically interacting with each other and working as a team. But further scientific study is required to fully understand this exact process.

A new research centre ‘The BRAIN Initiative’ was launched in 2014 with the aim to further understand brain function. Neurobiologist Cornelia Bargmann, co-chair of the BRAIN Initiative will be leading an ambitious project to map the brain. The aim is to establish key links between brain function and behaviour which will enable scientists to begin to understand key medical conditions such as Alzheimer’s.

In the future, the initiative could potentially demystify brain function, enabling us to solve mysteries such as how do we think, act and feel? By gaining deeper insight to our cerebral functions it may also enable us to fully understanding how creativity works.

 

Photography & Styling by Bea Mandelstam

www.braininitiative.nih.gov