Beatrice

3-Drawn

Beatrice
3-Drawn

The Far East is nurturing and producing young design graduates that are utilising the 3D printing pen technology to create installations and furniture.

Jungsub Shim, a Korean designer, spent months building up the structure of the Connect Chair using a 3Doodler, a 3D printing pen. The lattice frame was built using a similar process to that of a 3D printer. The pen extrudes lines of plastic-based filament that solidifies and can therefore be used to draw mid-air. The repetitive action of connecting the drawn lines creates a structure that can support the weight of a person.

Produced as part of her Furniture Design course at Hongik University, Seoul, Shim designed the piece with a focus on the theme of “Connection”. She drew on the complexities of modern life and the intricate connections we make.

A group of students from the University of Tokyo have also developed a technique using a 3D-printing pen in conjunction with digital tracking. A predesigned file is translated through the tracking system. This is used to guide the pen holder allowing for an accurate representation of the intended structure. Although temporarily intact, the structures can be strengthened and adapted at a later date making them incredibly versatile.  

The team of students, overseen by architect Kengo Kuma, describe the pieces simply as ‘hand drawn structures’ but believe it demonstrates how human instinct still has a role to play in digital construction technology. The technology used in this project was developed to automate roles traditional done by hand, however, in this context human intervention only enriches the outcome.